Manage Your Liver
Q:

Reversing cirrhosis is possible!

Reversing cirrhosis is possible!
A:

Fibrosis is scarring of the liver that results from chronic inflammation. It is a process where the damaged, dying liver cells are replaced by fibrous scar tissue, causing the liver to become hard. The extent of liver fibrosis can vary, and it is often classified in several stages. The most common classification is a scale from F0 to F4. F0 indicates no fibrosis. A normal liver is at a stage between F0 and F1. F2 denotes light fibrosis, and F3 indicates severe fibrosis. When scar tissue builds up and takes over most of the liver, stage F4 or cirrhosis is defined. [1][2]

 

For many years, cirrhosis has been considered as an incurable and irreversible condition by the medical world and the public. Doctors generally only advise patients to lead a healthy lifestyle. The lack of available treatment in the market has also left patients desperate and anxious. This may be true in the past, but with advances in medical technology and progress of research on cellular biology in the past decade, the situation has changed. There is now substantial evidence that fibrosis and cirrhosis can be reversed. Clinical reports suggest that fibrosis is generally reversible if the cause of the underlying disease is treated and if the lesions are not too severe. A study published in the Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition stated that the reversal of cirrhosis usually occurs in patients with liver disease for a relatively shorter period of time and after the successful treatment of the underlying liver damage, e.g. viral hepatitis. [3] Another research also concluded that reversal of fibrosis is possible and fibrosis is no longer viewed as a permanent process. [4]

 

This is great news to cirrhosis patients, especially those who have benefited from the recent development of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) which has enabled eradication of the hepatitis virus. With the underlying cause of liver damage treated, what’s left of the recovery process is to improve fibrosis or cirrhosis. As DAAs were only designed to eradicate the virus; patients must rely on other treatment methods to achieve this. Although there is yet to be a perfect, effective cure for cirrhosis, as mentioned above, research has proven that it is possible to reverse or at least improve the patient’s situation.

 

One of these treatment options is YHK, a natural liver therapy from Japan. Research has proven that YHK has anti-fibrotic properties that can prevent or slow down worsening of cirrhosis, as well as reverse fibrosis. According to a clinical study presented at the 14th AMMG, over 65% of patients’ stage of fibrosis improved. The most significant result saw one patient’s stage of fibrosis leap from F2 to F0-1. With the primary cause of liver injury cured and post-treatment protection therapy such as YHK, damage can be undone and liver health can be restored. [5]

 

Disclaimer:
  • * All research and clinical data should be used as reference purposes only, results may vary.
Tags:
CirrhosisFibrosisReverse CirrhosisCirrhosis treatmentFibrosis treatment
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